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Robotic Innovation Challenge

Every day we learn new skills and techniques and help solve problems for artists, makers, and entrepreneurs. Now it’s your turn to learn how robots can make a difference!

How the Robotic Innovation Challenge works!

Welcome Students!

Are you ready to learn more about robots and how they can be used to solve real-world problems? 

  • June 4–25 Open Registration
  • July 6-9 Kit Delivery
  • July 12-15 Training Sessions from 1-2 PM via Zoom
  • July 16 Robot Showcase from 1-2 PM via Zoom

Eligibility

The challenge is open to students in 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th & 8th grades.

Teams

Students can ONLY participate as a member of a team for the Robotic Innovation Challenge. Teams will be comprised of 2-5 members. 

Process

Students will learn about the Engineering Design Process and use it to define a problem, think of a solution, and program their robot to solve their challenge. Students will use the logbook template to record all of their ideas, questions, research, and results of the project. It is digital and easy to collaborate with team members.

Students will use the logbook template to record all of their ideas, questions, research, and results of the project. It is digital and easy to collaborate with team members.

Use the Engineering Design Process to guide your project.

Follow this engineering process to research a problem, build and test your solution, and then share it with the world!

Students will learn about the Engineering Design Process and use it to define a problem, think of a solution, create a prototype using new skills, and finally submit a slideshow presentation for their idea. Students will use the logbook template to record all of their ideas, questions, research, and results of the project. It is digital and easy to collaborate with team members. 

    Solve the world’s problems like an engineer! 

    1. Define the Problem: Look around and think about problems you see and experience in your everyday life. Select and define the problem you plan to solve in your digital logbook.
    2. Do Background Research: Find out existing solutions or attempts at solutions and think of how yours will be different. Be sure to paste titles and links of the resources you find into your logbook.
    3. Specify Requirements: What requirements do you need your project to have? Write them in your digital logbook.
    4. Brainstorm, Evaluate, and Choose Solution: Brainstorm possible solutions and choose one to try. Begin planning what skills and materials you will need to create a prototype. Write it all down in your digital logbook.
    5. Develop and Prototype Solution: Get your materials together and create a model of your idea.
    6. Test Solution: Test and Evaluate Prototype. Use your logbook to write your findings. Does your project meet the requirements you specified?
    7. Refine and Repeat Step 6 as necessary.
    8. Communicate Results: Design a presentation to communicate the results of your project.

    Robotic Challenge Concepts

     

    Healthcare 

    Many hospitals and nursing homes are understaffed. There is a critical shortage of healthcare workers in hospitals and nursing homes nationwide, especially in rural areas. Additionally, there is a shortage of primary care doctors in most of rural America. 

    How can we design a robot that can help ease the burden of stress and/or work overload in our healthcare system? Watch these videos for inspiration.

    Education 

    It is no secret that teachers are overworked and underpaid. There are many critical areas an average classroom teacher just cannot assist with. Students that do not speak English as their primary language, students with learning disabilities, and students who have to miss large amounts of school due to injury or illness.

    How can we design a robot that can assist students in the school/learning environment? Watch these videos for inspiration. 

    Social Justice: 

    The world is an unequal place. It means that not everybody has the same access to the same rights, opportunities, or quality of life. Though there are over 7 billion people in the world, if we think about it in terms of 100 people, here are some major social injustices: 

    • 86 people are able to read and write – 14 people cannot.
    • Only 7 people have a college/university degree or diploma – 93 people do not.
    • Only 40 people have an internet connection – 60 people do not.
    • 78 people have a place to stay that protects them from wind and rain (a house, apartment etc) – 22 people do not.
    • 91 people have access to safe drinking water – 9 people do not have a way to get clean water.
    • 88 people would have enough good nutritious food to eat –
    • 1 person would be dying from starvation.
    • Another 11 people would be undernourished (they don’t have enough good food).
    • 86 people can walk without assistance, 14 cannot
    • 95 people can see (with or without glasses) 5 cannot
    • 94 people can hear (with or without hearing aids) 6 cannot

    How can we design a robot that can assist/help to eliminate one area of social inequality.

    Overall Diversity Question: 

    Many robots use Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in their programming. However, there are race and gender issues in the algorithms. How will you be sure your robot does not have racial or gender bias?

    The Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub is a proud affiliate of Winrock International.

    FIND US IN NLR

    Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub
    204 E 4th St
    North Little Rock, AR 72114

    (501) 907-6570

    info@arhub.org

    OUR HOURS

    • 9AM to 5PM on Mon/Wed/Fri
    • 9AM to 7PM on Tue/Thu